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Experience the concert hall right at home!

Alongside renowned artists, the Orchestre Métropolitain and conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin offer you magnificent concert webcasts (on demand), captured with state-of-the-art sound and video quality at the Maison symphonique de Montréal. Enjoy an enriched digital experience thanks to our complementary content: online concert program, pre-concert talk and virtual prelude. Have a good time!

Hélène Grimaud & Yannick Nézet-Séguin
— October 15 – 24, 2021

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Upcoming webcast

Under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Masterful piano playing and poetic intensity come together to create the ultimate emotional experience in Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G Major. Performed by internationally renowned pianist Hélène Grimaud and conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, this piece by the legendary French composer is transcendent.

Dive into a dreamy orchestral memoire with Anishinaabekwe composer Barbara Assiginaak’s piece Eko-Bmijwang – As Long in Time as the River Flows. Floating on calm waters illuminated by Nokomis, Grandmother Moon, the audience takes a journey down the river to where the current changes course. Florence Price’s Symphony No. 1 blends genres, showcasing African American spirituals, hymns and dances, while working within the mold of the classical symphony.

Leong & Tétreault: Shimmering Strings
— December 10 to 19, 2021

Upcoming webcast

Under the baton of Erina Yashima

With Kerson Leong and Stéphane Tétreault, Brahms’s Double Concerto for Violin, Cello and Orchestra presents a Romantic vision of the concerto grosso. With its powerful melodies and intricately woven construction, the piece charms and stuns, time and again.

Under the baton of German conductor Erina Yashima, Dvořák’s luminously orchestrated Symphony No. 5 reveals the mature side of the composer, better known for his New World Symphony. With the first movement’s captivating melodies and the last movement’s poignant drama, it has an impact on everyone who hears it. Though she is only in her early forties, American composer and violinist Jessie Montgomery is at the peak of her craft. Her piece Strum, inspired by popular American folk melodies, leads the listener from nostalgia to pure delight.

A Nordic Tale
— March 4 to 13, 2022

Upcoming webcast

Under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin

The great Romantic-style musical fresco Concerto de Québec, written by local composer André Mathieu, is a piece that demands virtuosity. Yannick Nézet-Séguin will also be conducting Isabelle Panneton’s Promenade, a piece commissioned by the Orchestre Métropolitain, showcasing the Quebec composer’s refined harmonic style.

Can one find the sublime at the heights of despair? Sibelius’s Symphony No. 4—gloomy and dominated by the tritone, an interval suggestive of evil spirits—masterfully expresses human emotions like fear, rage and doubt in a way that words cannot.

A German Requiem
— June 10 to 19, 2022

Upcoming webcast

Under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the OM and the Chœur Métropolitain will perform A German Requiem—a piece where the human voice reaches new heights. Grappling with universal themes while confronting death with serenity and wonder, Brahms celebrates life on earth and beyond.

In contrast with Latin requiems replete with God’s wrath and repentance, Brahms’s work is a calming ode to the human spirit. The innovative and dramatic composition’s German libretto evokes feelings of hopefulness, sung by a choir and soloists in the style of an oratorio. A German Requiem is positively one of a kind.

Nicholas Angelich & Yannick Nézet-Séguin (program 2)
— July 1 to 10, 2022

Upcoming webcast

Under the baton of Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Soloist-in-residence Nicholas Angelich performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, featuring some of the Russian composer’s most famous melodies and rousing bravado. Angelich will be joined by conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin on piano to perform Ravel’s piano duet Ma mère l’Oye.

Long after he composed Funeral Song for his teacher Rimsky-Korsakov and subsequently lost the score, Stravinsky had forgotten the details of the piece. In his memoirs, he described it as a procession of instruments filing “past the tomb of the master in succession, each laying down its own melody as its wreath.” The work was rediscovered in 2015, and this performance will be its Montréal debut. The concert will be rounded out with Lili Boulanger’s D’un matin de printemps and Ravel’s La Valse, evoking grandeur and decadence in a lively ballet-cum-waltz.

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